Medical Writing Medical Devices Science journalism: In search of a new identity
cover-imagepng

Volume 26, Issue 2 - Medical Devices

Science journalism: In search of a new identity

Abstract

Abstract

Science journalism is undergoing a major transition due to changes in the relationship between science and society and dissemin - ation via digital and connective technologies, as is the case with other branches of journalism. The changes occurring in science journalism may concern medical writers who deal with communication targeted at nonexperts, in particular patients. This article presents a number of scenarios and a series of significant results of research that fuel the debate on the future of the information systems dealing with science, technology, and healthcare. Although the outlines of a new professional identity are still indefinite, some distinctive features emerge with more clarity than before. Science journalists will, on the one hand, have to integrate their traditional science translator skills with those of organisers and curators of the knowledge generated by different communities; on the other, they could become more and more the generators of new knowledge themselves.
Download the full article

References

  1. Lewenstein B. The meaning of ‘public understanding of science’ in the United States after World War II. Public Understand Sci. 1992;1(1):45-68. Available from: http://
  2. Gregory J, Miller S. Science in Public: Communication, Culture and Credibility. New York: Plenum Trade; 1998. Available from: http://
  3. Nelkin D. Selling Science: How the Press Covers Science and Technology. New York: W. H. Freeman; 1987. Available from: http://
  4. Broks P. Understanding Popular Science. Open University Press; 2006 Available from: http://
  5. Dunwoody S. Science journalism. Prospects in the digital age. In: Bucchi M, Trench B, editors. Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge; 2014. p. 27-39 Available from: http://
  6. Brumfiel G. Supplanting the old media? Nature. 2009;458(7236):274-7. Available from: http://
  7. Funtowicz SO, Ravetz JR. Science for the post-normal age. Futures. 1993;25(7): 739-55 Available from: http://
  8. Gibbons M, Limoges C, Nowotny H, Schwartzman S, Scott P, Trow M. The New Production of Knowledge. The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. London: Sage; 1994. Available from: http://
  9. Nowotny H, Scott P, Gibbons M. Re-Thinking Science. Knowledge and the Public in an Age of Uncertainty. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2001. Available from: http://
  10. Irwin A, Micheal M. Science, Social Theory and Public Knowledge. Maidenhead and Philadelphia: Open University Press; 2003. Available from: http://
  11. Irwin A, Wynne B, editors. Misunderstanding science? The public reconstruction of science and technology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 1996. Available from: http://
  12. Wynne B. Sheepfarming after Chernobyl: a case study in communicating scientific information. Environment. 1989;31(2): 10-5 and 33-9 Available from: http://
  13. Science and Society. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office; 2000. Available from: http://
  14. Einsiedel EF. Publics and their participation in science and technology. Changing roles, blurring boundaries. In: Bucchi M, Trench B, editors. Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge; 2014 Available from: http://
  15. Epstein S. Impure science: AIDS, activism and the politics of knowledge. Berkeley and London: University of California Press; 1996. Available from: http://
  16. Epstein S. Patient Groups and Health Movements. In: Hackett EJ, Amsterdamska O, Lynch M, Wajcman J, editors. The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies. Cambridge and London: The MIT Press; 2008 Available from: http://
  17. Bauer M. The medicalization of science news – from the “rocket-scalpel” to the “gene-meteorite” complex. Soc Sci Inf. 1998;37(4):731-51. Available from: http://
  18. Joss S. Public participation in science and technology policy- and decision-making – ephemeral phenomenon or lasting change? Sci Public Policy. 1999;26(5):290-3. Available from: http://
  19. Stilgoe J, Lock SJ, Wilsdon J. Why should we promote public engagement with science? Public Understand Sci. 2014;23(1):4-15 Available from: http://
  20. Sorrentino C, editor. Attraverso la rete. Roma: Rai-Eri; 2008 Available from: http://
  21. Allan S. Introduction: science journalism in a digital age. Journalism. 2011;12(7):771-7. Available from: http://
  22. Allan A. Making science newsworthy: exploring the conventions of science journalism. In: Holliman R, Whitelegg E, Scanlon E, Smidt S, Thomas J, editors. Investigating Science Communication in the Information Age: Implications for Public Engagement and Popular Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2009. p. 149-165 Available from: http://
  23. Dunwoody S. Science journalism. Prospects in the digital age. In: Bucchi M, Trench B, editors. Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge; 2014 Available from: http://
  24. Pitrelli N. Science journalism and digital storytelling. J Commun 2011;10(04) Available from: http://
  25. Pitrelli N. Science journalism to face a demand for renewal. J Commun. 2010;09(04) Available from: http://
  26. Trench B. Internet: turning science communication inside-out? In: Bucchi M, Brian T, editors. Handbook of Public Communication of Science and Technology. London and New York: Routledge; 2008 Available from: http://
  27. Brown P. An explosion of alternatives. Considering the future of science journ - alism. EMBO Rep. 2014;15(8):827-32 Available from: http://
  28. Mulder HAJ, Longnecker N, Davis LS. The State of Science Communication Programs at Universities Around the World. Sci Commun. 2008;30(2):277-87 Available from: http://
  29. Pitrelli N. Science and society: a dialogue without communicators? In: Avveduto S, Pisacane L, editors. Portrait of a Lady. Women in Science: Participation Issues and Perspectives in a Globalized Research System. Rome. Gangemi Editore; 2014 Available from: http://
  30. Journalism education reform trends, ideas and research. Roundup of recent news, publications. 2013 [cited 2016 Dec 15] Available from: https://journalistsresource. org/studies/society/news-media/ journalism-education-reform-trends-ideas-research
  31. Lynch D. Above and Beyond: Looking at the Future of Journalism Education. Knight Foundation. 2015 [cited 2016 Dec 15] Available from: https://kf-site-production. s3.amazonaws.com/publications/pdfs/000 /000/177/original/KF-Above-and-Beyond-Report.pdf
  32. Patterson TE. Informing the News. The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism. New York: Vintage Books; 2013 Available from: http://
  33. Anderson C, Bell E, Shirky C. Post Industrial Journalism: Adapting to the Present. Tow Center for Digital Journalism. 2014 [cited 2016 Dec 15] Available from: http://towcenter.org/research/post-industrial-journalism- adapting-to-thepresent-2
  34. Pitrelli N, Castelfranchi Y. Technoscientific hybrids. Science communication in pursuit of an academic identity. J Commun. 2009;08(01) Available from: http://
  35. Trench B. Science reporting in the electronic embrace of the Internet. In: Holliman R, Whitelegg E, Scanlon E, Smidt S, Thomas J, editors. Investigating Science Communication in the Information Age: Implications for Public Engagement and Popular Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2009. p. 136. Available from: http://
  36. Bauer MW, Gregory J. From journalism to corporate communication in post-war Britain. In: Bauer M, Bucchi M, editors. Journalism, Science and Society. Science communication between News and Public Relations. New York: Routledge; 2007 Available from: http://
  37. Fahy D, Nisbet MC. The science journalist online: shifting roles and emerging practices. Journalism. 2011. 12(7):778-93. Available from: http://

Search

Articles

Medical Devices: An exciting industry at a crossroads
President's Message
EMWA News
Writing for medical devices compared to pharmaceuticals: An introduction
Clinical Evaluation Reports from the medical writer’s perspective!
New EU medical device regulations: Impact on the MedTech sector
Medical Device Regulation: A necessary step towards more patient and user safety
Transparency – left to its own devices until now
Medical devices in the disclosure era and the role of medical writers
Does standardisation improve animal testing of medical devices?
Puns, promises, and metaphors: Medical device trade names
French breast implants, the Medical Device Regulation, and a theoretical case study
Science journalism: In search of a new identity
Can a medical writer submit a manuscript on behalf of a corresponding author?
To be or not to be – Are medical and scientific writers of non-native English origin at a disadvantage?
Winners of the Geoff Hall Scholarship Essay Competition
Good medical writing saves lives: The perspective of a former medic
Good medical writing saves lives – and even a little comma can make a difference
Abstracts from 44th EMWA conference Poster session
News from the EMA
Journal Watch
Gained in Translation
Getting Your Foot in the Door
In the Bookstores
Regulatory Matters
The Webscout
Good Writing Practice
Profile
Out on Our Own

Member Login

Links

The Write Stuff Archive Contact Instructions for Authors Feature Article Template (Word) Journal Policies

Editoral Board

Editor-in-Chief:

Co-Editor:

Managing Editor

  • Victoria White (Tampa, Florida, USA) Email: MEW@emwa.org
show all +

Associate Editors:

Section Editors:

Ad-hoc Editors:

  • Amy Whereat (SpeaktheSpeech Consulting, Asnieres sur Seine, France)

Editor Emeritus: