Medical Writing Medical Writing in Oncology Medical writing for cancer trials and submissions
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Volume 21, Issue 1 - Medical Writing in Oncology

Medical writing for cancer trials and submissions

Abstract

Cancer is currently a high-priority area for drug development. Most cancers are immediately life-threatening diseases demanding urgent treatment and therapies are usually highly toxic. This poses a range of specific challenges for the ethical conduct of clinical trials in cancer, including difficulties with performing placebo-controlled studies, blinding, and restricting off-protocol treatments that may impact on trial results. Overall survival is the gold-standard efficacy endpoint for cancer trials, but reliable results can require a long duration of follow-up. Other endpoints such as time to progression and tumour response rates are therefore also used. Where treatments are targeted at specific disease mechanisms, biological endpoints may also be assessed. Safety evaluations require an understanding of the effects of the disease and its treatment on the likely observed events and abnormalities. A thorough understanding of the specifics of the disease under investigation and established as well as experimental approaches to its treatment can help medical writers to produce consistent and accurate documentation throughout clinical development.

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References

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Articles

About the Medical Writing Journal
Oncology and medical writers
Message from the President
The war on cancer – What is the enemy, and are we winning?
Medical writing for cancer trials and submissions
Developing a treatment for ovarian cancer
The evolving landscape of medical education in oncology
Some considerations on the safety evaluation section of clinical study reports for studies with anticancer drugs
Identifying appropriate journals in which to publish original research on vaccines against human infectious diseases
New myths about English
From researcher in Europe to medical writer in India
Imaging techniques in oncology
Is cancer preventable? A literature review
A rising tide: Hospitals and social media
In the Bookstores
Journal Watch
The Webscout
Manuscript Writing
Regulatory Writing
Good Writing Practice
Out On Our Own
Translation Section

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  • Victoria White (Tampa, Florida, USA)
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  • Amy Whereat (SpeaktheSpeech Consulting, Asnieres sur Seine, France)

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