Medical Writing Trends in medical writing Subcontracting: Not for the faint of heart
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Volume 28, Issue 3 - Trends in medical writing

Subcontracting: Not for the faint of heart

Abstract

Subcontracting can be the answer to a successful freelancer’s prayers, or the opportunity to work harder than you have ever worked before for less money than you made when you were a struggling newbie. The potential advantages of subcontracting are numerous, including being able to meet more of your clients’ needs, expanding your reputation and your repertoire, reducing your personal writing workload, and making more money – even while you are sleeping. But the potential disadvantages of subcontracting are also numerous and very real. Subcontracting puts your reputation on the line and out of your hands and exponentially increases your risk for problems ranging from cash flow and liability exposure to conflicts of interest. Subcontracting is not a decision you make lightly, but neither was your decision to freelance. It might just be your opportunity to soar.

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References

  1. Miller EK. Multitasking: why your brain can’t do it and what you should do about it. [cited 2019 Jun 3]. Available from: https://radius.mit. edu/sites/default/files/images/ Miller%20Multitasking% 202017. pdf.
  2. Battisti WP, Wager E, Baltzer L, et al. Good publication practice for communicating company-sponsored medical research: GPP3. Ann Intern Med. 2015;163(6): 461–4.
  3. No authors listed. Recommendations for the conduct, reporting, editing, and publication of scholarly work in medical journals. 2018 [cited 2019 Jun 5] Available from: http://www.icmje.org/icmjerecommendations. pdf.
  4. AMWA-EMWA-ISMPP joint position statement on the role of professional medical writers. 2017 [cited 2019 Jun 5]. Available from: https://www.amwa.org/general/custom. asp?page=Position_Statement.

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Articles

Introduction
President's Message
EMWA News
Omics in silico and other trends in biomedical research: Impact on how and what we write
Catching the wave of lifestyle medicine
Artificial intelligence – will we be replaced by robots?
Now more than ever, scientists must speak up for science
When less is more: Medical writers as guardians of curated content
Predatory publishing – what medical communicators need to know
AMWA – EMWA – ISMPP Joint Position Statement on Predatory Publishing
How to combat medical misinformation with a sound content strategy
Subcontracting: Not for the faint of heart
Lay summaries and writing for patients: Where are we now and where are we going?
Clinical trial disclosure: Perspective from a medical writer for a contract research organisation
The 360° approach to authoring risk management plans
Trends in regulatory writing: A brief overview for aspiring medical writers
The medical writing landscape in China
News from the EMA
Regulatory Matters
Medical Communications and Writing for Patients
In the Bookstores
Getting Your Foot in the Door
Veterinary Medical Writing
Medical Devices
My First Medical Writing
Journal Watch
Good Writing Practice
Regulatory Public Disclosure
Out on Our Own

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