Medical Writing Careers in medical writing Career opportunities in medical device writing: Employee and freelance perspectives
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Volume 28, Issue 1 - Careers in medical writing

Career opportunities in medical device writing: Employee and freelance perspectives

Abstract

Many regulatory medical writers start their careers in pharma. Whilst many continue in pharma, some also work in medical devices and an increasing number are switching to medical device writing. This article explores how and why writers might move from pharma to medical devices, just write for medical devices, or work in both, and identifies the transferable skills from the perspective of two writers, one who is now employed by a medical device company and another who is freelance. With sound writing skills and broad experience, there is no reason why a writer cannot transition from pharma to medical device writing, work solely in medical devices, or even decide to work simultaneously in both fields.

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References

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Articles

Careers in medical writing
President’s Message
EMWA News
How to get your first job as a medical writer
Educating the medical writer: A 5-year update
Cheeky medical writers: Transitioning from academia to medical writing
Making the leap: My move from academia to medical writing
From bench to pen: Life as a new medical writer
The grass is always greener on the other side
Pharmaceutical writer or CRO writer – choosing the right path
Career shift: Employment to freelancing
Medical writing and medical translation – two crossing paths
Career opportunities in medical device writing: Employee and freelance perspectives
Career shifts – surviving a change in geography
Grant writing and editing
1000 words in 1 picture
Medical writing at the management level
Thriving (and not just surviving) in a VUCA healthcare industry
Elevate your medical writing team to success
Clinical trial disclosure landscape and awareness in Japan
News from the EMA
Regulatory Matters
Gained in Translation
In the Bookstores
Medical Devices
Journal Watch
Veterinary Medical Writing
Good Writing Practice
Medical Communication
Regulatory Public Disclosure
Out on Our Own
Vignettes - Life After Medical Writing

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