Medical Writing Careers in medical writing How to get your first job as a medical writer

Volume 28, Issue 1 - Careers in medical writing

How to get your first job as a medical writer

Abstract

A successful medical writer needs to be an excellent time manager, communicator, and team player, and show great attention to detail and commercial awareness, in addition to possessing core writing skills and the ability to evaluate and contextualise data. Above all, there must be an enthusiasm to learn. Researching and networking within the medical communications industry will help build a picture of a medical writer’s day-to-day activities. An online profile and error-free application closely tailored to the specific role and employer of interest, followed by illustrating relevant skills and potential with examples during interview, will supplement successful off- and on-site written tests and lead to the start of a career in medical writing.

References

  1. Jackson S, Billiones R; European Medical Writers Association. A Career Guide to Medical Writing. 2016 [cited 2018 Dec 10]. Available from: https://www.emwa.org/Documents/ Training/MW%20Career%20Guide%20 Ver%20Nov%202016.pdf.
  2. Battisti WP, Wager E, Baltzer L, Bridges D, Cairns A, Carswell CI, et al. Good Publication Practice for Communicating Company-Sponsored Medical Research: GPP3. Ann Intern Med. 2015;163(6): 461–4.
  3. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals. 2017 [cited 2018 Dec 10]. Available from: http://www.icmje.org/recommendations.
  4. Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry. Code of Practice for the Pharmaceutical Industry. 2016 [cited 2018 Dec 10]. Available from: http://www.pmcpa.org.uk/thecode/ InteractiveCode2016/Pages/default.aspx.

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How to get your first job as a medical writer
Educating the medical writer: A 5-year update
Cheeky medical writers: Transitioning from academia to medical writing
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From bench to pen: Life as a new medical writer
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Pharmaceutical writer or CRO writer – choosing the right path
Career shift: Employment to freelancing
Medical writing and medical translation – two crossing paths
Career opportunities in medical device writing: Employee and freelance perspectives
Career shifts – surviving a change in geography
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Medical writing at the management level
Thriving (and not just surviving) in a VUCA healthcare industry
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Clinical trial disclosure landscape and awareness in Japan
News from the EMA
Regulatory Matters
Gained in Translation
In the Bookstores
Medical Devices
Journal Watch
Veterinary Medical Writing
Good Writing Practice
Medical Communication
Regulatory Public Disclosure
Out on Our Own
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